Tina Brown
Tina Brown

Tina Brown and the New York Times have parted company. The Times sold its 30 percent stake in Brown’s Women in the World Media, which produces the Women in the World Summit events, for “a nominal amount” last year, according to a disclosure filed Tuesday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Brown, who has been editor-in-chief of both the New Yorker and Vanity Fair, formed Women in the World in 2010, and entered into a multiyear agreement with the Times in December 2014 to collaborate on the production of the series. Brown and her company moved into the Times office building in 2015. According to a report in the Hollywood Reporter, it is unclear when her team moved out. A dedicated Women in the World website is still up and running, but has no Times branding. The ninth annual Women in the World Summit is scheduled for April 12-14.

NRA TV

Roku has rejected calls from antigun activists to stop offering NRA TV, which the Roku website calls “your source for the world's most comprehensive video coverage of Second Amendment issues, events and culture.” The company said in a statement that though it feels “deep sadness” over the shooting at Margery Stoneman High School that took the lives of 17 people, “we do not curate or censor based on viewpoint."  While such businesses as Hertz, MetLife, Enterprise and United Airlines have ended their partnerships with the NRA, Roku, along with companies including Amazon, Apple and FedEx, have not done so. Roku says that it has no commercial relationship with the NRA, noting that NRA TV is available to consumers for free and carries no advertising. It also said that it welcomes "other important groups to use our platform to share their messages too,"

Ken Kurson
Ken Kurson

Modern Consensus, a news site offering insight and analysis into the cryptocurrency markets and blockchain technologies, has been launched by Ken Kurson, former editor-in-chief of the New York Observer. The site will offer what Kurson calls “intelligent, focused, and engaging reporting of the blockchain and cryptocurrency space – not just the technology but the people behind the technology.” Its name is taken from the consensus mechanism that many blockchains use to verify transactions. Lawrence Lewitinn, who recently served as the Observer’s deputy editor and business & technology senior editor, will serve as editor-in-chief of the site. Joining Kurson and Lewitinn are general manager Kevin Sanders, who will handle all business elements of the site, and contributing reporter Dylan Love, who was previously a tech reporter for International Business Times, The Daily Dot, and Business Insider.