Kevin Mayer
Kevin Mayer

Disney is undergoing an executive shuffle that underlines the company’s emphasis on streaming as it prepares to complete a $52.4 billion deal for a range of Fox holdings. Kevin Mayer, currently Disney’s chief strategy officer, will now head its Direct-to-Consumer and International segment. That segment will include Disney’s proposed family-friendly streaming service, as well as ESPN+ and the company’s majority stake in Hulu. Mayer will also oversee BAMTech, the streaming video technology company in which Disney acquired a majority stake last year, and the global distribution of all direct-to-consumer content. A new Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division, to be led by current Disney Parks and Resorts chair Bob Chapek, will merge Disney’s consumer products business with Walt Disney Parks and Resorts. The Media Networks division, co-chaired by ESPN president James Pitaro and Disney/ABC television group president Ben Sherwood, will shift international Disney Channel operations to Mayer’s division, which will also pick up the program sales function of the Studio Entertainment division, headed by Alan F. Horn. “We are strategically positioning our businesses for the future, creating a more effective, global framework,” said Disney chairman and CEO Robert A. Iger.

Shepard Smith
Shepard Smith

FOX News re-signed Shepard Smith, who has been with the network since its startup in 1996, to a multiyear deal. Smith will continue to serve as chief news anchor and managing editor of breaking news, as well as hosting “Shepard Smith Reporting.” The program averages 1.6 million viewers, with 335,000 in the 25-54 demographic in its 3 p.m. ET slot, leading both CNN and MSNBC in the time period, according to Nielsen Media Research. In announcing the deal, News Corp CEO Rupert Murdoch referred to Smith as “an exemplary journalist whose skill in anchoring breaking news is unrivaled.” Terms of the new contract were not disclosed.

Ellies
One thing was missing at this year’s National Magazine Awards: an award for best magazine. Replacing Magazine of the Year were two new categories: one for social media and one for digital innovation. The American Society of Magazine Editors, which administers the awards, said the move reflects the fact that the awards are no longer limited to honoring print magazines. The social media trophy was given to SELF for its development of a cross-platform community focused on health and wellness, while the digital innovation award went to SB Nation, a sports news website owned and operated by Vox Media. Overall, New York and The New Yorker (which counted among its awards one to Ronan Farrow for his reporting on the Harvey Weinstein scandal) came out on top at the ceremony, each taking home three Ellie Awards.